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Wednesday, January 20

  1. page Evaluation of Goals edited Course Reflections Which of our three goals do you feel you improved on the most? Better reader,…
    Course Reflections
    Which of our three goals do you feel you improved on the most? Better reader, better write, or better speaker & listener?
    · The goal I feel I improved the most on was becoming a better writer. This semester, I started to use advanced vocabulary (more difficult words than I did last year), and I learned how to write an essay using a generic introduction, how to develop good topic sentences, and how to conclude my essays. I also feel that I have become a better writer due to all of the essays we wrote this semester, and all of the time that we spent working on writing introductions, topic sentences, and such. It really helped a lot!
    How has this course helped me to become a more caring, competent, contributing citizen in an ever-changing global community?
    · I believe this course has helped me become more caring because I was able to make so many new friends this year in honors English II. With the friendships that I have built throughout this course, I know these are true friends. I have become more contributing because I have started contributing more of my own ideas to class discussions we have occasionally, which has helped me to voice my opinion in a situation.
    What will you take away from this class? What will you remember?
    · Something I will surely remember from this class is all of the discussions we got into about politics, the current state of the economy, and what our President is up to. I also won’t forget all of the people that I got to know that I normally wouldn’t have talked to in the hallways at school. A thing I will take away from this class is how much my writing has improved in just one semester. I can now write a three to five page report with a correct introduction, with body paragraphs – perhaps block style or point-by-point – that are coherent, and finishing with a strong conclusion. Something else I will take away from this class is how to incorporate in-text citations into my writing and essays.
    Self Evaluation
    Did I achieve my personal goals for this course?
    · Yes, I believe I did achieve my goals. I have become a faster reader, and I was able to read the books in the curriculum much more quickly at the end of the semester compared to the start of the school year. I wanted to improve on my writing, and I sure did. Last year I was unable to write an essay with adequate introduction, body paragraphs (with details all askew), and a conclusion that left the reader hanging on. This year, I learned how to fix these problems.
    Did you give your personal best?
    · Yes, I believe I did give my personal best. I always had my homework completed – and handed in on time, and I always made sure I contributed at least one of my own thoughts to our discussions about the novel or memoir we were currently reading.

    (view changes)
    8:08 pm
  2. page Vocabulary Page edited Adulterate (v.): To corrupt, make worse by the addition of something of lesser value ... the wa…
    Adulterate (v.): To corrupt, make worse by the addition of something of lesser value
    ...
    the water.
    Altruistic (adj.): Unselfish, concerned with the welfare of others
    ...
    of others.
    Ambidextrous (adj.): Able to use both hands equally well; very skillful; deceitful, hypocritical
    ...
    very neat.
    Brandish (v.): To wave or flourish in a menacing or vigorous fashion
    ...
    brandish manner.
    Comprise (v.): To include or contain; to be made up of
    ...
    a conclusion.
    Culinary (adj.): Of or related to cooking or the kitchen
    ...
    to take.
    Dearth (n.): A lack, scarcity, inadequate supply; a famine
    ...
    his insufficiency.
    Delete (v.): To erase, wipe out, cut out
    ...
    start over.
    Demise (n.): Death, especially of a person in a lofty position
    ...
    his family.
    Discrepancy (n.): A difference; a lack of agreement
    ...
    Troy Polamalu.
    Embark (v.): To go aboard; to make start; to invest
    ...
    opilio crab.
    Exhilarate (v.): To enliven, cheer, give spirit or liveliness to
    ...
    Grand Canyon.
    Guise (n.): An external appearance, cover, mask
    ...
    and costumes.
    Holocaust (n.): A large-scale destruction, especially by fire; a vast slaughter; a burnt offering
    ...
    the holocaust.
    Ironic (adj.): Suggesting an incongruity between what might be expected and what actually happens; given to irony, sarcastic
    ...
    ironic tone.
    Jeopardy (v.): Danger
    ...
    in jeopardy.
    Pinnacle (n.): A high peak or point
    ...
    large fee.
    Pliable (adj.): Easily bent, flexible; easily influenced
    ...
    be pliable.
    Turbulent (adj.): Disorderly, riotous, violent; stormy
    ...
    and flooding.
    Verbatim (adj., adv.): Word for word; exactly as written or spoken
    · When you go to college, it is important to write all of the professor’s notes verbatim
    (view changes)
    7:54 pm
  3. page Vocabulary Page edited Adulterate (v.): To corrupt, make worse by the addition of something of lesser value · When sewe…
    Adulterate (v.): To corrupt, make worse by the addition of something of lesser value
    · When sewers flow straight into a lake or stream, it adulterates the water.
    Altruistic (adj.): Unselfish, concerned with the welfare of others
    · A true altruistic person is not selfish, but cares about the welfare of others.
    Ambidextrous (adj.): Able to use both hands equally well; very skillful; deceitful, hypocritical
    · My friend Greg is ambidextrous and his handwriting is always very neat.
    Brandish (v.): To wave or flourish in a menacing or vigorous fashion
    · She was so excited to meet Josh Groban that when she finally did, she shook his hand in a brandish manner.
    Comprise (v.): To include or contain; to be made up of
    · My essay was comprised of a cover page, introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.
    Culinary (adj.): Of or related to cooking or the kitchen
    · If you enjoy cooking, a culinary school may be a good career path for you to take.
    Dearth (n.): A lack, scarcity, inadequate supply; a famine
    · He had a dearth of teaching experience, and was not qualified for the job because of his insufficiency.
    Delete (v.): To erase, wipe out, cut out
    · After writing my entire essay on the wrong topic, I had to delete it and start over.
    Demise (n.): Death, especially of a person in a lofty position
    · In honor of his demise, a funeral was held for him and his family.
    Discrepancy (n.): A difference; a lack of agreement
    · My dad and I have a discrepancy on our favorite Pittsburgh Steelers players; my favorite player is Ben Roethlisberger and my dad’s favorite player is Troy Polamalu.
    Embark (v.): To go aboard; to make start; to invest
    · Every January, the boats on “Deadliest Catch: embark on an adventure to the Bering Sea in hopes of catching large amounts of opilio crab.
    Exhilarate (v.): To enliven, cheer, give spirit or liveliness to
    · She felt great exhilaration when she was basking in the beauty of the Grand Canyon.
    Guise (n.): An external appearance, cover, mask
    · On Halloween night, children of all ages will dress up in guises and costumes.
    Holocaust (n.): A large-scale destruction, especially by fire; a vast slaughter; a burnt offering
    · Many Jews had perished during the time of the holocaust.
    Ironic (adj.): Suggesting an incongruity between what might be expected and what actually happens; given to irony, sarcastic
    · He asked the teacher if he had to do his homework, and the teacher replied to his question in an ironic tone.
    Jeopardy (v.): Danger
    · When the boy scouts got lost in the dense woods, their live were in jeopardy.
    Pinnacle (n.): A high peak or point
    · People are able to climb to the pinnacle of Mount Everest, for a large fee.
    Pliable (adj.): Easily bent, flexible; easily influenced
    · In order to learn how to do a split, a gymnast must be pliable.
    Turbulent (adj.): Disorderly, riotous, violent; stormy
    · When a hurricane hits the mainland, it brings turbulent winds, rain, and flooding.
    Verbatim (adj., adv.): Word for word; exactly as written or spoken
    · When you go to college, it is important to write all of the professor’s notes verbatim

    (view changes)
    7:53 pm
  4. page Glossary of Important Terms edited Writing Writing Terms · Thesis Thesis Statement Limited · Limited subject (rel…
    Writing
    Writing
    Terms
    · Thesis

    Thesis
    Statement
    Limited

    · Limited
    subject (relatast(relates to the topic)
    Action

    · Action
    verb (no
    ...
    "there are")
    Controlling

    · Controlling
    idea (attitude
    ...
    the story)
    · Clincher

    Clincher
    Statement
    Draws

    · Draws
    everything to a close
    Relates

    · Relates
    back to the beginning
    · Major

    Major
    Support
    Main

    · Main
    ideas that
    ...
    topic sentence
    Meat

    · Meat
    and potatoes
    · Minor

    Minor
    Support

    · Specific details
    · Supports the major support
    Coherence
    · Details and facts make sense
    · Order of facts and details is correct
    Transition
    · Words and phrases that connect the idea
    · Transition between sentences and paragraphs
    · In paragraphs: “Also” “Next” “Then” “First” “Second” “Third”
    Grammar Terms
    8 Parts of Speech
    1. Noun – A person, place, thing, or idea
    2. Pronoun – Take the place of common nouns
    3. Adjective – A word modifying a noun or pronoun
    4. Verb – A word expressing an action or state of being
    5. Adverb – A word modifying a verb, adjective, or another adverb
    6. Interjection – A word expressing strong emotions
    7. Conjunction – A connecting word
    8. Preposition – Explains a relationship between two nouns
    Phrase
    · A group of words that has either a subject or predicate, but not both
    Clause
    · A group of words that contain a subject and predicate and is used as part of a sentence
    Passive Voice
    · A form of the verb ‘to be’ along with a past participle (usually together in an sentence)
    Parallel Structure
    · Similar ideas being expressed in similar ways
    Literary Terms
    Personification
    · Human qualities giving to abiotic (non-living) or non-human things
    Imagery
    · Use of vivid figurative/descriptive language to represent objects, actions, or ideas
    Foreshadow
    · Clues indicating what is going to happen next
    Simile
    · Comparing two things using like or as
    Metaphor
    · Comparing two things without the use of like or as
    Allusion
    · Instance of indirect reference
    Conflict
    · Collision or disagreement within a piece of literature; the rising action
    Reference
    http://www.dictionary.com

    (view changes)
    7:24 pm
  5. page Glossary of Important Terms edited Writing Terms · Thesis Statement Limited subject (relatast to the topic) Action verb (no "…
    Writing Terms
    · Thesis Statement
    Limited subject (relatast to the topic)
    Action verb (no "there is" or "there are")
    Controlling idea (attitude toward subject; provides focus for the rest of the story)
    · Clincher Statement
    Draws everything to a close
    Relates back to the beginning
    · Major Support
    Main ideas that support the topic sentence
    Meat and potatoes
    · Minor Support

    (view changes)
    6:42 pm
  6. page Tuesdays With Morrie edited ... {http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa190/Rasmoose23/twm.jpg?t=1264028702} twm.jpg picture by …
    ...
    {http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa190/Rasmoose23/twm.jpg?t=1264028702} twm.jpg picture by Rasmoose23
    What can we learn from reading this book?
    ...
    do so.
    Favorite Quotations:
    ...
    page 52.
    To Morrie, the most important thing in life is basically to learn how to keep your heart ‘open’ so love can find a way in, and to learn how to give your love, by means of volunteer work or loving another human being.
    ...
    page 80.
    Nowadays, people know that someday they are going to die, but do not believe it when they’re young. A young person thinks death will come with old age, but that is not always the case.
    ...
    page 82.
    Instead

    Instead
    of fretting
    ...
    to live.
    4.

    4.
    “The fact
    ...
    page 91.
    Today, the strongest and most secure foundation people stand on is family. Our family gives us strength in time of trouble and worry, and family is there in your time of need. With family, there is always a sense of security, no matter what the situation may be.
    Answers to Essential Questions:
    · What do you value most in life?
    o I value a few things in life. In my own life, I value the friendships I share with all of my friends – old and new, and those still to come. Without those friendships, I would not be the person I have become today. Something else I value in life is my family. They give me the strength to achieve my dreams, and I don’t know what I would have done without them. I also value the relationship I have with God that I have built.
    · Who are the people that influence you the most in your life?
    o The people that influence me most in my life are my family members and my friends. I have grown up with the values that my family treasures, and I have been greatly influenced with the friends whom I hang out with. I found a small circle of friends this school year who have brought out my best qualities, and have helped me greatly. :)
    · What is life’s greatest lesson?
    o I believe that life’s greatest lesson is to live like you were dying, and to live every day like it’s your last. You need to treasure every moment of every day in order to appreciate life, like Morrie teaches us through the memoir Tuesdays With Morrie. Once we have discovered how to live every day like it was our last, we will live fulfilling lives full of purpose.

    (view changes)
    6:29 pm
  7. page Tuesdays With Morrie edited ... Written by MItch Albom {http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa190/Rasmoose23/twm.jpg?t=1264028…
    ...
    Written by MItch Albom
    {http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa190/Rasmoose23/twm.jpg?t=1264028702} twm.jpg picture by Rasmoose23
    ...
    this book?
    From Tuesdays With Morrie, we can learn how to appreciate life, and how to live every day like it was our last. What I mean by appreciating life is, we shouldn’t go about living unhappy lives; we should appreciate the fact that we are alive and well, but also that we should do something productive with our lives. And to live everyday like it’s your last, treat every day like a gift – that’s why we call it the present. By doing so, we can live more fulfilling lives, like Morrie was instructing us to do so.
    Favorite Quotations:
    1. “The most important thing in life is to learn how to give out love, and to let it come in.” – page 52.
    To Morrie, the most important thing in life is basically to learn how to keep your heart ‘open’ so love can find a way in, and to learn how to give your love, by means of volunteer work or loving another human being.
    2. “Everyone knows they’re going to die, but nobody believes it.” – page 80.
    Nowadays, people know that someday they are going to die, but do not believe it when they’re young. A young person thinks death will come with old age, but that is not always the case.
    3. “Once you learn now to die, you learn how to live.” – page 82.
    Instead of fretting the day you die and being terrified of death, Morrie wants us to learn how to die in order to learn how to live. When you’re dying, you want to preserve every last minute of life you have, and to make the most of your time left. If you appreciate every moment of every day, you truly know how to live.
    4. “The fact is, there is no foundation, no secure ground, upon which people may stand today if it isn’t the family.” – page 91.
    Today, the strongest and most secure foundation people stand on is family. Our family gives us strength in time of trouble and worry, and family is there in your time of need. With family, there is always a sense of security, no matter what the situation may be.

    (view changes)
    6:20 pm
  8. page Tuesdays With Morrie edited ... Written by MItch Albom {http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa190/Rasmoose23/twm.jpg?t=1264028…
    ...
    Written by MItch Albom
    {http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/aa190/Rasmoose23/twm.jpg?t=1264028702} twm.jpg picture by Rasmoose23
    Summary:What can we learn from reading this book?
    From Tuesdays With Morrie, we can learn how to appreciate life, and how to live every day like it was our last. What I mean by appreciating life is, we shouldn’t go about living unhappy lives; we should appreciate the fact that we are alive and well, but also that we should do something productive with our lives. And to live everyday like it’s your last, treat every day like a gift – that’s why we call it the present. By doing so, we can live more fulfilling lives, like Morrie was instructing us to do so.

    (view changes)
    3:51 pm

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